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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
    GORGEOUS!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. #22
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    Nice learning topic Jason .

    One thing that I wanted to comment on -- kinda a side-topic, but relatable .

    I had a litter in 07 -- full-term , but most had real full bellies . I ended up losing one baby due to this hardening of the yolk . So in a small litter that I had in 09 , born 1 week early (only 8 babies) , most of the babies were born with full yolk sacs - not absorbed yet . I have read that they should be placed in small deli cups and kept warm and moist . But I was also concerned that if they absorb all of the yolk, then I'd run the risk of the solidified yolk problem . So -- I did two things --- some were placed in a deli-cup (three of them) , and some (the best looking ones) I tied and cut the full yolk sacs away that day before absorbtion . All of the deli-cup babies died within 2 days, and the ones that were cut/tied , lived - they were thin after their first shed , but they lived and ate well for me . This is only one small trial, so its not any great learning experience for anyone . If this happens again , I might let some yolk be absorbed , but not for very long.

  3. #23
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    AWESOME info!! Thank you!!

  4. #24
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    Thanks for the compliment but I regret "jacking" a thread of such a serious nature - my apologies to the OP and all following. I was making the point that I am torn between tapping this girls full potential and the risk of losing her all together, she is a prized possession. You all have been down this road with me before.

    I must say that the input from this thread alone is redefining trends in breeding. R.I. has become a think tank that the entire reptile community can use as a resource - library, so to think.

  5. #25
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    Is this what you're talking about, David. his guy is doing well for me now.

    Picture courtesy of Jesse Van Atta.


  6. #26
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    First off: Fantastic Thread! You just don't get this on other forums. This is just another of the defining characteristics of this site and it's members.

    Second: Great addition to an already informative thread David. I completely agree with you on the babies that are attached to a large external yolk, cut them just below the "knot" or "bump" in the cord, and they seem to do well... In my experience anyway.

    I'm not 100% certain, correct me if I'm wrong Jason... But looking at this photo from the original "First litter of the season - Salmon Jungles (Lots of pics!)" It appears to me that most, but not all of the babies have none or very little external yolk left, but most of them have large "yolk bellies." I think that Jason has done a great job at saving the ones that he has.

    My question is this: Does anyone know, or theorize, what the determining factor is in the babies being born with large external yolks and propotioned bodies vs. babies with little external yolks and big yolk bellies such as this litter? It seems to me that I have seen premature babies in both scenarios...
    Quote Originally Posted by JasonGonzalez View Post
    Jeff Carr
    West Coast Constrictors

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by oregonboas View Post

    I'm not 100% certain, correct me if I'm wrong Jason... But looking at this photo from the original "First litter of the season - Salmon Jungles (Lots of pics!)" It appears to me that most, but not all of the babies have none or very little external yolk left, but most of them have large "yolk bellies." I think that Jason has done a great job at saving the ones that he has.

    My question is this: Does anyone know, or theorize, what the determining factor is in the babies being born with large external yolks and propotioned bodies vs. babies with little external yolks and big yolk bellies such as this litter? It seems to me that I have seen premature babies in both scenarios...

    When I moved the babies away from mom and into a 32 qt. tub, only two of them had external yolk attached. That external yolk fell off the next day on it's own.

    After this litter I would prefer to have babies with large external yolks rather than large bellies. IMO it's easier to tie off the external yolk than it is to get rid of the internal yolk and the babies get off to a much faster start. So if anybody has an idea on how we as breeders can control something like that during gestation, I would love to know.


    .
    Jason Gonzalez

  8. #28
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    Jan 2009
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    Default The ugly side of breeding boas (EXTREMELY GRAPHIC!)

    Couple more things I want to ad the "PD" Albino litter I had last Aug did have
    some yolk bellies but not serious . So 92* and high humidity is what
    I gave them. I still lost a couple babies but something else happened
    kind of unrelated, they had some weak spot where there yolk
    entered their stomach , that area broke that's an unrelated subject.
    I even took several to the Vet for necropsy and Pathology just
    to confirm my theory , she agreed, every had clean bill of health
    other than that weak stomach area

    Anyway what I want to touch on was my friend Paul had the Salmon Leopard
    babies last summer. Several had external and internal yolk,
    they were very weak.

    So I had heard about something , I wanna see if anyone else has tried this ?......

    One baby that would've died , her stomach was not closed .So I decided
    to try to squeeze some yolk back out of the stomach.

    It was pretty interesting, I squeezed out the yolk and didn't harm her
    Then put her in the rack she closed her stomach up in less than a day
    The only problem was I wanted her heat to be at 94* F but couldn't
    keep his rack at constant higher heat where its located. We had an
    external heat source but that was inadequate.

    So she passed 2 days later, I still believe had we been able to keep
    the heat up to raise her metabolism it would've done the trick.

    Many days later he had one other baby or two that developed hard yolk way
    back by the vent, one he successfully squeezed the chunks out
    the other it didn't work out, it tore around the vent.

    I'm wondering if anyone else has tried squeezing excess yolk out
    of the new born babies belly ?

  9. #29
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    More bad news. Last night one of the Salmon Jungles from this litter starting to "firm up" around the mid-section. From the two before her I knew that it wouldn't be long before it was over. So I decided to try a tip I got from one of the Big Boys (not sure if he wants his name mentioned) and got mixed results.

    Before I go into that I would just like to say that I have tried everything to keep the yolks from solidifying. High temps and humidity, massaging the bellies, soaking, etc. None of those were working so I opted for something a little more severe. Here's the results:

    I used a 21 gauge needle (the largest I could find at that hour, 16 gauge is what was recommended) and inserted it into the umbilical area of the stomach. I then extracted as much yolk as possible and kept doing this until no more yolk would come out. Some pics to illustrate.

    Before:



    First withdrawal:





    Afterward (after two large withdrawals):



    Empty:




    After the "procedure" the little female seemed to be doing much better, but unfortunately I think I caught it too late and this morning I found her dead in her tub. I really feel this method would have worked had I caught it earlier. I tried this on several of her siblings and they are all doing much better as of this afternoon so we'll see how they progress.

    Thanks to all who have emailed or called with helpful tips. They are much appreciated!


    .
    Jason Gonzalez

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarM View Post

    One baby that would've died , her stomach was not closed .So I decided
    to try to squeeze some yolk back out of the stomach.

    I'm wondering if anyone else has tried squeezing excess yolk out
    of the new born babies belly ?
    I didn't squeeze any yolk out, but when I withdrew the needle from some of the babies the yolk would spill out on it's own. So it's kind of the same concept and if done soon enough I don't see why it wouldn't work.

    Thanks for sharing.
    Jason Gonzalez

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