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  1. #1
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    Default How slow do you grow?

    I was having a discussion on this last evening and have answered several questions as to my opinion on feeding and growing Bcc slow.

    I have been accused of growing them to slow but the results my animals give me tell me that they are thriving well.

    I feed neonates a fuzzy mouse or rat pinky once every 10 days. after the frist year they go to a 14 day schedule, at the beginning of the third year the females remain on the 14 day schedule and the males are then fed once a month.

    I also want to note that I feed only large enough prey to put just a slight bulge in the animal just after it has consumed the prey item.

    This is an 08 female Suriname just at 30 inches and feeging on large adult mice or weaned rat pups every two weeks.


    This is an 07 Blast litter Peruvian male on a once a month feeding schedule


    This guy is one of those that just grow faster he is a Rentfro Peru boa, a year younger than the Blast animal above but just as bi if not bigger , he was put on once a month feeding earlier than most my males.


    This is another Blast Peru Boa but this is a girl and a bit larger that her brother, she is maintained on the 14 day feeding program.
    Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking.

    Joel Thomas

  2. #2
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    Default

    I start my babies on hopper mice. they get about 4 or 5 of those and I switch them to medium mice. By the end of the first year they feed on large mice or small rats.

    fuzzy mice and pinky rats are to small IMO most of my boas don't even recognize them as food.
    Ed Lilley
    www.constrictorsnw.com

    Check my available snakes at this link:
    http://www.reptileinsider.com/classi...panamared.html

    I rejoined facebook... I don't feel good about it...



    [/I]

  3. #3
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    I'm right there with ya Joel!

    I don't go to a 1x month feeding with my males, but I also keep them a few degrees warmer than you do so that when cool in the winter, I don't have to take them to such a cool temp.

    IMO, slow and steady wins the race with boas, and even more so with BCC.

    Ed made an interesting comment the other day and said that the only females he's lost during gestation were those that were raised to be big, and it was done quickly (and by someone else). I'm not sure how often it happens (I'm sure it does), but I can't recall someone posting that they lost a gravid female who was sexually mature by conservative standards, who had less fat and more muscle than the average boa, and was not BIG. Can anyone recall an instance like that? Like I said, I'm sure it happens, but every one I remember was big females with lots of fat who were raised quickly - and are sometimes probably too young to breed without complication.

    Slow and steady...

    jb

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by PanamaRed View Post
    I start my babies on hopper mice. they get about 4 or 5 of those and I switch them to medium mice. By the end of the first year they feed on large mice or small rats.

    fuzzy mice and pinky rats are to small IMO most of my boas don't even recognize them as food.
    I agree with you on the fuzzy mice being to small for most Bci and for Peru Bcc but for the shield Bcc I think they are the safest way to go to avoid regurgitation syndrome and so far I have been lucky enough to avoid that affliction.

    I also try to use adult mice for as long as possible for the lower fat content than young rats.....for the ones that I am raising myself it is all about cooking them slow and avoiding obese animals as adults.
    Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking.

    Joel Thomas

  5. #5
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    Exactly I tray and use something as close to an adult animal as possible for food.. The younger prey has less bone mass and muscular structure.. I find it leads to runny stool, and dehydration.

    On the shield BCC I just told someone to buy a het roswell from the same litter as mine. My male is 46 inches feeding on small rats. So a friend of mine contacted them about getting a male het and they told him they were feeding on hopper mice. I can't say their feeding is wrong but we are talking about a 14 month old eating hopper mice VS a sibling here feeding on small rats with ease..

    My male has never had an issues feeding I don't have to push him he gets there on his own. But at the same time I also put my male in a 2x2x1 cage shortly after I got him. I knew he was a keeper early on and he went into a cage not a little tub.

    At some point I think there is to slow, and the other end to fast. Right in the middle is where I shoot for.. I keep an eye on their growth and shoot for them to keep that bread loaf build.

    I think BCC regurge issues are more do to small (young) prey.. I bet most BCC with issues taking larger food would be fine in a week or 2 after a little yogurt to build better gut bacteria..
    Ed Lilley
    www.constrictorsnw.com

    Check my available snakes at this link:
    http://www.reptileinsider.com/classi...panamared.html

    I rejoined facebook... I don't feel good about it...



    [/I]

  6. #6
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    Wow over a year old and still feeding on hopper mice....I thought I was conservative but I believe that is a little overboard.

    As for the Bcc regurge issue, I think it is too large of food item along with temps to low or high. You could be right with the prey being to small as in not enough bone mass and too much fat or even milk.

    I had a themostat fail on me last year and two animal from the same litter started regurging for sevarl meals....none of the other Bcc the same size or even smaller had any problems.....both animals pulled through but was a rocky road.

    Once you get past the first year I have never seen an issue with this syndrome but once it starts it is hard to pull the animals through, this may
    need to go up as its own thread as I would love to hear opinions of others.
    Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking.

    Joel Thomas

  7. #7
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    I'm on the same page. I grow my BCC and BCI very, very slowly. I don't do the whole scheduled feeding because I don't think a boa should ever be forced to eat. Most boas, given the offer, will eat whether or not they need the food. Without a schedule though, they only eat when they are hungry, hence avoiding obesity.

    One other thing I've been trying recently is to provide different prey sizes during each feeding. One week I'll feed them a slightly larger (very slightly) prey size and another week I'll feed a smaller prey size to even things out. My reasoning for this is that:

    1. I don't think boas in the wild really get the exact same prey size every time they eat; sometimes they eat smaller animals and sometimes they eat bigger animals, and I believe this variability helps them average out to a decent size.

    2. I'm also trying to observe changes in the behavior of my boas from a lack of a consistent feeding pattern.

    I've only been trying this recently so I can't make any definite observations, but so far the results have been promising and have kept my animals in fairly good shape.

  8. #8
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    Interesting discussion guys. It's good education for a fella like me that has just gotten into boas and is used to feeding Burmese Pythons. Although, I think I feed the Burms here slower than most feed theirs.
    Joel Thornburg

  9. #9
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    Not to beat a dead horse here...LOL.... but I find this kind of thread interesting.

    I have 3 male keepers born about the same time, kept in the same size cage right next to each other. They are all different sizes and have a little difference in locality (sort of)

    het roswell male 14 months 37.5% suriname 46 inches

    Dh ghost jungle ( Colombian type) 15 months 39 inches

    Super salmon jungle ( 50% Nicaraguan) 14 months old 36 inches

    I think they all fall right into where they should be for their age and locality size background.

    On the note JB was talking about on losing females gravid.. I have thought about ever female I had produce a good litter from and their build as well as how well they recovered after birthing a litter..

    The females I have lost over the years were all females I had purchased as adults, and were sedentary animals. All of the other that had great litter, and recovered rapidly, were born and raised here or bought as a sub adult, and are active boas that move around and do things every night.

    I think the feed and amount as well as activity level of each one plays a big role in their life.
    Ed Lilley
    www.constrictorsnw.com

    Check my available snakes at this link:
    http://www.reptileinsider.com/classi...panamared.html

    I rejoined facebook... I don't feel good about it...



    [/I]

  10. #10
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    L.A. California
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    Your boas look fine...keep doing what your doing! I usually start to feed a little heavier once they are over 18 months and well established. I feed males every 3 weeks and females every 2!! Neo's I feed every 14 days on something very small. Sometimes I even wait till they poop it out first. The heat is pretty high like 90 and the humidity in my boa room is between 60-80% all year long...
    www.TheBoaCollective.com
    Anthony Phommasith

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