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  1. #11
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    So you had to go through the permit process,robert did most of it for you thou?So do you plan to buy a mate and breed later?Im not, I got mine to have as a pet and raise for fun and didn't have to do the permit cause I bought in state,mine is a pet quality one,he was a discounted one with a slight tail kink and a few split scales but not bad.His parents were from different people ,steve binning X Bruce but as you know some pairs don't match so well with this species as the gene pool is small.Hes good thou for me and they all need homes right!..old picture,hes over double this size now.They grow fast don't they.....Hes a black faze,i was told ,but has some red from bruces stock,i guess!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eminart View Post
    What I really WANT to do is a full bioactive enclosure. I've done them with smaller, less messy snakes, and really like them. I've been debating for months if it would work with a big, poopy indigo. But, it turns out, one of the guys on an indigo facebook group has put a couple of his in bioactive cages this year and he says it's working well and he likes it. So, I'm going to continue letting him be the guinea pig before I decide for sure.

    I plan to build my own cage with sliding doors. I'll do at least 6'x2'. I'd like to do bigger, but, so far, my wife is reluctant to part with piece of furniture that is in my way. As far as heat, if I do go bioactive, I'll use a lamp or a ceramic bulb with LED lighting. If I don't do bioactive, I don't know. I might use a UTH in that case.

    I don't have a huge collection. My daughter has a couple of corn snakes, but technically, I just have the indigo and my new boa. I also have a tortoise, and some tarantula spiderlings. So, I don't have an overwhelming amount of stuff to clean and feed. Making naturalistic habitats has always been one of my favorite part of keeping herps. So, I'd love to do a nice display for my indigo. Hopefully, the guy that's trying it will continue to report good things.
    Whats bioactive,live plants and stuff?Sounds cool,lol

  3. #13
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    Apr 2015
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    Yours is a beauty. I don't know if I can afford to breed these things. LOL. I'd like to eventually, but if I do, it will probably be a while down the road. Right now, I'm just happy to keep mine as a pet. If I ever do breed, I think my first female will be a black phase. I like those just as much as the red.

    Yeah, bioactive is a natural set up that includes plants and bugs in the dirt (isopods, springtails, etc.). Basically, it's a little ecosystem. The plants and bugs break down the waste so that, theoretically, you really don't clean anything up. With a larger snake, especially an indigo, you probably still have to spot clean and remove the large waste. But the bugs and stuff break down the residue that sinks into the soil. It's very common with the dart frog people, but more and more reptile people are doing it. I think the monitor guys are really starting to go that way. The Art of Keeping Snakes, by Philippe de Vosjoli is a book that explains the bioactive philosophy. It's decent, but really doesn't get too indepth.

    Oh, and yeah, I did have to go through the permit process. Not just the interstate license. I had to get a written permit from the Alabama Division of Wildlife & Freshwater Fisheries, since indigos are endemic to the extreme southern portion of my state. It was a bit of a hassle, and nobody really seemed sure how to handle it, but it eventually got done.
    Last edited by eminart; 04-14-2015 at 08:30 PM.

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  5. #14
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    Dam you know your stuff bro!The bio thing is interesting but ,2 questions,first don't springtails need a lot of moisture to thrive?So wouldn't that have your snake laying on a moist substrate and in near 100% humidity? I got spring tails when I had Ts from the moisture,and they got on my T,so can they get around the eyes or scales of a snake?To kill them id remove the T and water bowl and leave top off for a week and once its dry the mites were dead,then spot clean and put t back in,Ts are up off the substrate but snakes are on it and can get scale rot.And I cant image a eastern in this setup not stinking up a living room?As soon as walk in the snake room, I know when the indigo has pooped,it smells bad.But mine eat fish and all sorts of hairless and nonweaned stuff.

  6. #15
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    I'm certainly not an expert, but I have my daughter's corn snakes set up this way right now. Springtails live just about everywhere that isn't bone dry. They're very commonly found in leaf litter and even grass. You don't have to keep the substrate wet. The way I've set the enclosures up in the past, I have a drainage layer of gravel on bottom, with soil over that. I have a pvc pipe glued to the wall that extends down to the drainage layer. I can pour water in that to keep all the plants happy, without soaking all the substrate. Then the moisture just wicks up through the soil just like it would outside. I also sometimes water the top of the soil if it does get too dry.

    When a snake craps on this, you scoop as much out as possible, then use a fork or something to kind of turn the soil in that area. That gets the leftover waste down into the soil where more of the microfauna can get to it. Believe it or not, these kinds of setups smell much less than any other kind of substrate I've ever used. It just smells like earth.

    I've never had any issues with the springtails bothering the snakes.

    Now, how well this works with an indigo is still a good question. But it does work with a lot of species.

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  8. #16
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    I should also add that most of the work is actually done by bacteria rather than the springtails and isopods.

  9. #17
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    You don't want springtails in your T cages do you?Ok that set up does make sense!More then I can do for my boa numbers,but I really like the whole natural earth cage thing.Its new to me,but I like things like this.LOL...Honey can I do a 6x30x18 Bio active eastern cage in the living room?Ok ,,,keep it in the snake room, that's what I thought!LOL

  10. #18
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    As far as I know, springtails are harmless in T cages too, but I haven't researched that much. I do know there are some people doing it. Usually these types of setups end up with predatory mites that don't bother other animals, but actually eat the kinds of mites that do.

    You should check out the book I mentioned if you're interested. It's probably too much to set up if you have lots of snakes, but it's good for a display or two. Boas are probably just too big. The indigo will be pushing it.
    Last edited by eminart; 04-15-2015 at 08:45 AM.

  11. #19
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    Great stuff in this thread. I wish I had the $$ for one of these. They hit the mark as far as activity and food response.

    I like the size, and think they are probably an apex predator in the reptile world at least in the Americas.

    I've seen some other videos of these guys, and they are very fast and keyed in on their prey.

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  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gio View Post
    Great stuff in this thread. I wish I had the $$ for one of these. They hit the mark as far as activity and food response.

    I like the size, and think they are probably an apex predator in the reptile world at least in the Americas.

    I've seen some other videos of these guys, and they are very fast and keyed in on their prey.
    They're awesome snakes. Probably not for everybody due to how much they eat and the inevitable amount of waste from eating that much. But, they are interesting to watch. I've heard a lot of people compare them to elapids/cobras in their behavior. They are very alert, and quick when they want to be, but quite a bit more docile than your average cobra. I first learned about them when I was just a kid checking out reptile books from my elementary school library. I was excited to see "Alabama" listed as their native range. I thought I might find one someday. It took me getting a little older and wiser to realize they lived in the extreme southern part of the state, and I lived in the northern part (Not to mention, they were probably already extirpated from Alabama by the time I was reading those old books). But, I always wanted one, and last year, nearly 30 years after I learned about them, I finally bit the bullet and got one. And he's been worth it, so far.
    Last edited by eminart; 04-15-2015 at 09:21 AM.

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